Cave diving in the British Virgin Islands

I love diving and swimming in the ocean. It’s such a unique release from everything and an exhilarating way to get some exercise and feel at one with nature. I was fortunate enough to dive in the Blue Hole in Belize at the end of last year, which was spectacular. But there are some incredible dives to enjoy in our local British Virgin Islands waters too. There are always new wonders to find in the BVI. This photo is from a recent dive to a cave right under our house on Necker Island. 

Richard diving in a cave

Although plenty of pirate gold is rumoured to be hidden in the depths around these parts, we didn’t find any treasure on this occasion. But we did see lots of magnificent ocean life.

Necker Island

We also have the wonderful Kodiak Queen nearby off the shore of Virgin Gorda. I’ve shared the story before of how we rescued the former Navy fuel barge, which survived the attack on Peal Harbour, from a junkyard in Road Town back in March 2017.

After an amazing transformation by Unite BVI and the team, it is now an underwater art installation and a fascinating dive site for the BVI. Watch Rob Sorrenti’s brilliant film about the Kodiak Queen to learn about its remarkable history and exciting future as an inspiration to generations of ocean lovers.

After an amazing transformation by Unite BVI and the team, it is now an underwater art installation and a fascinating dive site for the BVI. Watch Rob Sorrenti’s brilliant film about the Kodiak Queen to learn about its remarkable history and exciting future as an inspiration to generations of ocean lovers.

2019 is shaping up to be a huge year for the ocean. Today just over two per cent of the ocean is strongly protected in marine reserves – this has to change this year. We need governments to act now to protect at least 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030 and reduce CO2 emissions as quickly as possible with a goal of zero net emissions by 2050.

Richard Branson

As Ocean Unite have pointed out, it’s estimated that strongly protecting 30 per cent of the ocean would cost about US$ 225 billion, but the financial net benefits could be as much as US$ 920 billion by 2050. Protecting the ocean makes financial as well as environmental and moral sense.

As we celebrate another grandchild in our family, I am more determined than ever to help ensure they do not grow up in a world without the wonders of the ocean. Let’s all work together to ensure future generations can continue to enjoy the ocean for centuries to come.

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