What would happen if identical twins went to space? How would it affect the human body, and would it affect the twins differently? We should soon find out.

I’m delighted to share the news today that Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss have just signed up to become astronauts 700 and 701 aboard Virgin Galactic. Although many family members have signed up to fly to space together, Tyler and Cameron are the first identical twins to sign up with Virgin Galactic.

My friend and NASA Shuttle Pilot Mark Kelly is also an identical twin. He and his brother Scott are performing a fascinating experiment while Scott is in space aboard the International Space Station in 2015. Scott will be participating in a NASA study, which will monitor the changes in his body resulting from space travel, and then compare his health to Mark’s back on Earth. 

The experiment’s name - Differential Effects on Homozygous Twin Astronauts Associated with Differences in Exposure to Spaceflight Factors – is a mouthful, but its results should be mesmerising.

Learning more about space, and providing better access to space has potentially countless benefits for humanity, as Tyler and Cameron so eloquently explained in their blog. We already enjoy satellite television, GPS and even memory foam mattresses because of the space industry. Once we have regular and reliable access to space imagine the possibilities.

They are also among a growing number of future astronauts to purchase their flights with bitcoin. It’s well worth reading their thoughts on combining the two innovative technologies, as well as highlighting the history and future of adventure and space travel.

Judging by the photos of yours truly with Tyler and Cameron, I hope zero gravity doesn’t make them any taller!

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